Rolling stock manufacturer Stadler and British rail operator Greater Anglia have unveiled a new bi-mode train model at InnoTrans 2018.

The bi-mode train model will form part of a new fleet that will start operating on the UK’s East Anglia network next year.

Under a contract awarded in 2016, Stadler is currently manufacturing 58 new trains, which include 14 class 755/3 three-car and 24 class 755/4 four-car BMUs, ten 12-car class 745/0 electric multiple units (EMUs) and ten 12-car class 745/1 EMUs.

Once complete, these new units will be leased to Greater Anglia, which will replace its existing trains with the new fleet.

The contract is financed by Rock Rail East Anglia, a joint venture between Rock Rail, Aberdeen Standard Investments and GLIL Infrastructure.

Stadler group chief executive Thomas Ahlburg said: “The contract awarded two years ago was our first for intercity and local trains in the UK, and we are immensely proud to be showcasing this state-of-the-art new vehicle, together with our partners, Greater Anglia and Rock Rail.

“More than half of the new trains will be bi-modes, underscoring our commitment to finding ever greener solutions to power trains and cut CO2 emissions.”

“More than half of the new trains will be bi-modes, underscoring our commitment to finding ever greener solutions to power trains and cut CO2 emissions.”

The new bi-mode trains have been designed with 20% more seats than the existing fleet. They also feature larger windows, low flooring and USB sockets at every seat.

Additionally, all bi-mode trains will be completely air-conditioned and feature separate bicycle spaces along with special toilets for disabled people.

A total of 38 trains from 58 unit fleet will be bi-mode, allowing them to run on electric power and diesel modes. It will help Greater Anglia run these trains on rural routes.

Alongside supplying the rolling stock, Stadler is responsible for maintaining the fleet at Crown Point depot in Norwich.

At InnoTrans, Stadler also introduced new trains for Glasgow Subway in Scotland.