Swiss transport company Rhaetian Railway (RhB) and rolling stock manufacturer Stadler have unveiled the new Capricorn train.

The vehicle is capable of operating as separable multiple units, a feature that will enable the half-hourly cycle on single-track routes in Swiss canton Graubünden to be completed without line extensions.

The train is part of the Sfr361m ($361m) contract awarded by RhB to Stadler in June 2016. Under the contract, Stadler will deliver 36 four-car trains to the Swiss transport company.

RhB director Dr Renato Fasciati said: “The new Capricorn is a historic milestone in two respects. Firstly, we can offer our passengers more comfort. The successive commissioning of the new trains will give us modern rolling stock accessible to handicapped passengers on our entire main network.

“With an order value of 361 million Swiss francs, this is the largest procurement project in our history.”

“Secondly, with an order value of 361 million Swiss francs, this is the largest procurement project in our history. The new trains represent a significant leap forward in terms of rail traffic productivity in Graubünden.”

The Capricorn train is composed of separable multiple units, which can be divided into sections during transit with two partial trains continuing to different destinations.

The units can be coupled together during the return journey. Capricorn trains feature automatic coupling to ensure smooth operation as separable multiple units.

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Capable of operating at a maximum speed of 120km/h, each train feature 164 seats, with 35 in first class. They are equipped with power outlets, a modern passenger information system, a firefighting system and space to store bicycles and luggage.

Three of the four cars will have low-floors to ensure access for passengers with reduced mobility.

Additionally, the trains will feature disabled toilets, wheelchair spaces and tactile signage to assist the visually impaired passengers.