High-speed rail line developer Texas Central has selected Resource Environmental Solutions (RES) as the ecological services partner for the high-speed rail line between Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston in the US.

RES will be responsible for protecting and preserving natural ecosystems and the environment along the high-speed route throughout construction and operations.

The company will ensure that the project complies with the US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) requirements and minimise any potential environmental impact along the train’s route between Houston and North Texas.

RES CEO Elliott Bouillion said: “We believe that by engaging with partners dedicated to low-impact design and development, it’s possible to achieve both environmental sustainability and advanced infrastructure.

“The Texas high-speed train is an excellent example of how a modern, green infrastructure approach can be harnessed for both ecological and economic benefits.”

“The Texas high-speed train is an excellent example of how a modern, green infrastructure approach can be harnessed for both ecological and economic benefits.”

As a part of the comprehensive mitigation strategy, RES will devise a long-term plan to restore wetlands and streams in the impacted watersheds.

Viability of several sub-watersheds close to the route is also expected to be enhanced, according to initial ecological planning.

Additionally, RES will ensure that the project fulfils all environmental mitigation requirements and improves local ecosystems and communities.

Besides preserving the flora and fauna, the services will help to increase flood resiliency along the high-speed route.

Texas Central project delivery director Bill Tucker said: “The elite team of ecologists at RES will help safeguard local ecosystems, and this is one more example of our approach to protect the land and wildlife in a delicate manner.”

The high-speed rail project will connect North Texas, the Brazos Valley and Houston in a 90-minute trip.

Services are estimated to remove more than 14,630 cars a day from Interstate 45, improving air quality in the region.