Canadian Pacific opens new intermodal facility in Saskatchewan

15 January 2013 (Last Updated January 15th, 2013 18:30)

Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) has opened its new intermodal facility at Saskatchewan's Global Transportation Hub (GTH) in Regina, Canada.

Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) has opened its new intermodal facility at Saskatchewan’s Global Transportation Hub (GTH) in Regina, Canada.

Spread across a 300-acre area, the new facility is located next to the company’s mainline route between Regina and Moose Jaw.

According to CP, the new facility will increase capacity and service reliability for intermodal customers with improved services.

GTH chair of the board of directors Bill Boyd said: "Through clients like CP, the GTH is stimulating economic development through new jobs, private-sector investment and enhanced access to global supply chains."

GTH president and CEO Chris Dekker commented: "The actual concept and development of the GTH began over five years ago and was predicated on CP relocating its intermodal facility from downtown Regina to our current site."

Compared to CP’s previous Regina terminal, the new facility will be capable of processing about 250,000 or five times more containers a year.

CP executive vice president and chief marketing officer Jane O’Hagan said that the company’s access to the major North American and world market will be improved with the new facility, as well as its ten other intermodal locations.

"The new facility is located next to the company’s mainline route between Regina and Moose Jaw."

"The opening of the new intermodal terminal will contribute to CP’s commitment to supporting further growth with our customers and improving supply chain efficiency in the region," O’Hagan said.

"CP’s co-location strategy positions key customer distribution centres adjacent to high-capacity intermodal facilities to drive superior efficiencies and service levels," O’Hagan added.

CP joins Loblaw, Consolidated Fastfrate (CFF) and the Yanke group of companies in locating to the GTH, which includes about 1,700 acres of serviced land.

Canada’s intermodal trains transport a variety of international and domestic products, including consumer products such as electronics, clothing and furniture, as well as automotive parts and agricultural specialty crops like peas, beans, lentils, soya beans and alfalfa.