Bombardier opens people mover at Atlanta Airport

17 May 2012 (Last Updated May 17th, 2012 18:30)

Canadian rail car manufacturer Bombardier has opened its extended Innovia APM 100 automated people mover (APM) system at the new $1.4bn Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in the US.

Bombardier Innovia APM 100

Canadian rail car manufacturer Bombardier has opened its extended Innovia APM 100 automated people mover (APM) system at the new $1.4bn Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in the US.

The Canadian rail car maker secured the contract to extend the transit system to the new international terminal in December 2007, which included the supply of 10 Innovia APM 100 vehicles and all electrical and mechanical equipment related with the 0.68km dual-lane extension.

For the APM system, the company designed and supplied the electrically powered, rubber-tired, driverless Innovia APM 100 vehicles with Bombardier CITYFLO 550 automatic train control. The vehicles were manufactured in the Bombardier plant in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US.

The rail manufacturer also supplied communications and power distribution systems, station platform doors and outfitted the new maintenance and storage facility. It also provided project management, systems engineering and integration, testing and commissioning.

The line has been extended to 4.51km and now operates 59 vehicles, reducing the journey time from the main terminal (Concourse T) to the new Concourse F to about 10 minutes.

Around 80% of the Hartsfield-Jackson Airport passengers ride the APM system, which operates in an underground spine, and the transit system moves around 200,000 passengers daily between the main terminal and air-side concourses.

Bombardier has also supplied similar systems to more than 20 airports, including Beijing, China, Frankfurt, Germany, Rome, Italy, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Singapore, Madrid, Spain and London.


Image: The Bombardier Innovia APM 100 is expected to serve millions of passengers at the newly opened $1.4bn Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Photo: courtesy of Bombardier.