3M introduces two anti-graffiti overlaminates

25 July 2012 (Last Updated July 25th, 2012 18:30)

UK-based technology firm 3M has introduced two new overlaminates to protect train graphics and surfaces from damage caused by spray painting, felt tip markers and other methods.

Anti-graffiti Surface Protection Films from 3M

UK-based technology firm 3M has introduced two new overlaminates to protect train graphics and surfaces from damage caused by spray painting, felt tip markers and other methods.

The new overlaminates include Scotchgard graphic and surface protection films 8993 and 8995-124. The former is a high-gloss version that helps improve and maintain exterior train branding, while the latter comes in matte that reduces reflections in train interiors.

3M marketing coordinator of commercial graphics division Lucy Anderson said that vandalism and graffiti remain a big issue for train operators and they are often fined for graffiti-marked carriages.

"In response to this, 3M has announced two new, flexible surface protection films that offer the required level of anti-graffiti properties and abrasion resistance," Anderson said.

"The overlaminates are designed to withstand harsh solvents that are needed to clean the surface and remove graffiti."

 

3M’s 8993 film will be available in 48-inch, 54-inch and 60-inch widths by 50m graphic panels, which can be printed to cut material wastage, increase roll efficiency and lower production costs.

The 8995-124 film will be available in 48-inch sheets and helps minimise the mirror-effect, which means that branding and advertising can be read clearly.

The polyester films, which are highly durable, make sure that the graphics remain in good condition for the duration of a brand campaign, according to 3M.

The company said that the overlaminates are designed to withstand harsh solvents that are needed to clean the surface and remove graffiti.


Image: The two new surface protection films are intended to provide the required level of anti-graffiti properties and abrasion resistance for the rail industry. Photo: courtesy of 3M.