The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) has said it is concerned about Transport Canada’s (TC) response to the recommendations of its investigation on the train derailment in Quebec in 2013.

TC issued an emergency directive in October that addresses several of the weaknesses in the Canadian Rail Operating Rules regarding to the securement of equipment.

TSB Chair Kathy Fox said: "With respect to preventing runaway trains, TC has introduced multiple layers of defences that, if fully implemented, will significantly reduce risks.

"With respect to preventing runaway trains, TC has introduced multiple layers of defences that, if fully implemented, will significantly reduce risks."

"But with respect to TC auditing and oversight activities, we are concerned that the department has not yet put in place an effective oversight regime that guarantees all railways will be audited in sufficient breadth and frequency to ensure safety issues are addressed in a timely manner."

This directive suggests instructions for handbrake effectiveness testing, additional physical securement measures and a standardised handbrake chart.

TSM said that the effective implementation of safety management systems (SMS) will be the significant step that make Canadian railway safer.

TSB has demanded TC to audit the SMS of railways in sufficient depth and frequency to confirm that the required processes are effective, and that corrective actions are implemented to improve safety.

In July 2013, a Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway (MMA) train, carrying 7.7 million litres of petroleum crude oil derailed in the town of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec. The accident caused the deaths of 47 people.