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Thales to supply CBTC systems for Ottawa Light Rail Transit project

5 March 2013

Ottawa light rail transit project

Thales Canada's transportation solutions business division has secured an order to deliver advanced signalling systems for the new Ottawa Light Rail Transit (OLRT) project.

Under the deal, Thales will install its communications-based train control (CBTC) system technology on the 12.5km Ottawa LRT east-west Confederation Line; the company's Toronto office will design, build and maintain the systems in addition to supporting their installation and commissioning.

Thales Canada vice-president and managing director of transportation solutions Michael MacKenzie said that Thales installed its CBTC technology on the Toronto SRT and Vancouver SkyTrain Expo Line in 1985 to provide better operational performance as well as improve safety and reliability.

"In Canada over the years, we added SkyTrain's Millennium and Canada Lines and we are now working on Edmonton Transit's North LRT and Vancouver's Evergreen Line," MacKenzie said.

Thales Canada's CBTC system is semi-automated, incorporating automatic train supervision and protection technology to assist drivers with a safe and reliable operation.

"Thales installed its CBTC technology on the Toronto SRT and Vancouver SkyTrain Expo Line in 1985 to provide better operational performance as well as improve safety and reliability."

Rideau Transit Group (RTG) was selected in February 2013 to design, build, finance and maintain the C$2.1bn ($2bn) first line of the OLRT project.

RTG is a consortium led by ACS Infrastructure Canada, and comprises Alstom, Dragados, SNC-Lavalin, EllisDon and Veolia.

Work under the first phase of the project involves the construction of a 12.5km light rail line through the city, with work scheduled to start in spring 2013.

The new line will run from Tunney's Pasture Station to Blair Station, including a 2.5km downtown tunnel from Brickhill Street to south of Laurier Avenue, while the remaining LRT alignment will follow the city's existing bus rapid transit corridor, Transitway.

Around 13 new stations will be built along the route, three of which will be located in the underground downtown core portion.

Scheduled to be open by 2018, the new LRT line will transport an estimated 10,000 people an hour in each direction during the morning rush hour, saving transit riders around 15 minutes on their daily commute.


Image: Thales will install its semi-automatic CBTC system on the 12.5km Ottawa LRT, covering 13 new stations and a 2.5km tunnel under Ottawa city centre. Image: courtesy of Ottawa Light Rail.