Network Rail to upgrade signalling on Norwich, Yarmouth and Lowestoft lines


UK’s Network Rail is set to install a new signalling system on train lines in Norwich, Yarmouth and Lowestoft as part of its Railway Upgrade Plan.

A part of a £68m investment to modernise the railway, the new system will replace some of the oldest signalling equipment on the network.

Under the programme, a remote computer-based signalling control system, 66 new colour light LED signals and 22 power-operated points will be installed.

The new equipment will eliminate physical operations on the line, and facilitate a safer and reliable service to passengers.

“This is a significant project that will not only transform rail travel for passengers in this region but also bring benefits for motorists and pedestrians."

Network Rail Anglia route managing director Meliha Duymaz said: “This is a significant project that will not only transform rail travel for passengers in this region but also bring benefits for motorists and pedestrians.

“We are working to provide a sustainable and efficient railway, which uses modern technology, to improve safety and reliability as part of our Railway Upgrade Plan.”

The scope of the programme also includes the modernisation of level crossings to comply with the latest safety standards.

A new modern barrier type will be installed at the level crossings that would be controlled by a signaller using CCTV.

The initiative is expected to ease regional congestion and reduce delays in road traffic movement.

The work is scheduled to be carried out at several places on the line, while additional upgrades will continue between next month and March 2019.

Network Rail also installed the first new overhead wires on the Southend Victoria branch line under a £46m programme.

The installation of more than 1km of wire between Shenfield and Billericay will expedite train movement to and from London.


Image: New signalling system will be installed on the train lines in the Norwich, Yarmouth and Lowestoft areas. Photo: courtesy of Network Rail.