News, views and contacts from the global Railway industry
 

Morocco awards Tangier-Kenitra high-speed line contract

8 April 2013

ONCF train in Casablanca.

Morocco's national railway operator Office National des Chemin de Fer (ONCF) has awarded a €136m contract to Colas Rail and its subsidiary Colas Rail Maroc to design and build a 185km double-track high-speed train line between Tangier and Kenitra.

Colas Rail and Colas Rail Maroc, as part of a consortium with Egis Rail, will have a €124m share in the deal.

Work is set to feature track studies, supply of materials, and construction of catenary systems and two worksite facilities.

A consortium comprising Ansaldo STS France and Cofely Ineo has been awarded a €120m contract to design and supply signalling, train control and telecommunications systems for the line.

Consortium leader Ansaldo STS will be responsible for all phases of the signalling implementation from design to integration and commissioning.

"Work is set to feature track studies, supply of materials, and construction of catenary systems and two worksite facilities."

The scope of work for Ansaldo STS also includes the supply of telecommunications equipment, electronic interlockings, track circuits, ETCS Level 1 and 2 to support running at speeds of up to 320km/h, and a traffic control centre in Rabat.

A fleet of 14 double-deck Alstom Duplex trains were ordered for the project by ONCF under a €400m deal signed with Alstom in 2010.

Cofely Ineo will be responsible for the installation of line-side equipment, installation of power supply and cable networks, as well as complex and critical systems.

The Moroccan railway operator also intends to upgrade the existing line between Kénitra and Casablanca to minimise travel time between Tangier and Casablanca from the current 3h 40min to 2h 20min.

The Tangier - Kénitra high-speed line is expected to open in the first half of 2016.


Image: ONCF will operate the new double-deck Alstom Duplex trains at 320km/h on the new line and 220km/h on upgraded existing lines. Photo: courtesy of Anaselg.